Indian Fashion

Old is truly gold, it seems. And nobody seems to better at following this adage than our Indian fashion industry. We are all set with a 70’s comeback. Maybe it’s the influence of Om Shanti Om, or maybe it’s just that true style never dies- think what you may, but it’s hard to deny that the 70’s are back in your face.

Take a walk down the street, and what do you see? You’ll see atleast one man wearing trousers slightly flared near the ankle (called bellbottoms in their day), and atleast a few girls wearing decorative scarves, jazzy earrings, with a wave in their hair.

Meghna Dutta, studying Fashion Design at Symbiosis Institute in Pune welcomes the change. She says, “True style never goes out of style, it’s a rather bad joke, but it’s true! The 70’s are back in a big way.”

Even shops are cashing in on the 70’s frenzy, selling snazzy earrings, thick framed glasses, big bangles, and clothes outlets are not far behind. With polka dots, leggings, bellbottoms, drainpipe trousers, and A-line dresses back in fashion- one simply cannot go wrong. Even the beaded look has made a comeback, beads being a must-be part of any girl’s wardrobe nowadays.
Ashish has just bought himself a pair of bellbottoms, and is quite pleased. He says, “I know it’s outlandish, but hey- it’s the 70’s look, and I want to be in with it!”

So many girls envied Deepika Padukone’s look in Om Shanti Om, and so many men wished they could look like Om, played by Shahrukh Khan. Well, now that the 70’s are back, go retro and be part of the movement!

Fashion Models

In regards to Indian fashion, the world certainly sits back and takes notice. Not only do they provide clothes of international standards and designs, the fashion industry has discovered many a face that’s walked global ramps over the years. Indian models can always be told apart from their European counterparts, but they certainly have made their mark. So what is the reason for such a high demand for Indian models, especially women folk? Honestly it’s not only their dusky skin that woos the world. The truth is Indian models may have an awkward stiffness about them at the beginning but once a little prodding and they could be the epitome of all that’s needed in an international model.

They are more full bodied as compared to many other nationalities without being on the overweight or bulgy category. Best of all, most leading ladies are well educated and speak well. They can hold their shoulders above the crowd and get an audience anytime they preferred. They gain ample knowledge that boosts their confidence through timely fashion shows all through the year, which leaves them very professional. Furthermore, they always carry a bit of back home with them, so mixing international modeling needs and fitting into Indian cultural settings proves to be affine mix for them and it always works to their advantage.

Ancient Indian fashion garments

Varied styles and textiles add immense diversity to Indian fashion and hence India is considered the perfect spot for fabric shopping. Ancient Indian fashion garments generally used no stitching although Indians knew about sewing. The traditional Indian Dhoti, the Scarf or Uttariya, and the popular Turban are still visible India and continue to be part of Indian fashion. Likewise, for women, the Dhoti or the Sari as the lower garments, combined with a Stanapatta forms the basic ensemble, and once again consists of garments that do not have to be stitched, the stanapatta being simply fastened in a knot at the back. And the Dhoti or the Sari worn covering both legs at the same time or, in the alternative, with one end of it passed between the legs and tucked at the back in the fashion that is still prevalent in large area of India. Indian men and women wear these garments in the usually hot Indian climate. – dhoti when he speaks of ‘turbans used for trousers’, and a kaupina when he is speaking of ‘a rag of two fingers’ breadth bound over the loins.

Bhagalpur is an ancient Indian centre for the manufacture of a unique cotton/silk blend of the same name. The ancient Indian fashion did not really have garments that were sewed together! Indian sari remains the traditional clothing of Indian women. Worn in varied styles, it is a long piece of flat cotton, silk or other fabric woven in different textures with different patterns. The sari has a lasting charm since it is not cut or tailored for a particular size. This graceful feminine attire can also be worn in several ways and its manner of wearing as well as its color and texture are indicative of the status, age, occupation, region and religion of a woman.